LIANZA Weekend School – Spreading the Net

It was a wet and windy weekend in Wellington as library staff from near and far gathered at Massey University to attend the LIANZA Weekend School in late October. I was fortunate to have received funding from Aoraki LIANZA to attend after they put out a callout for sponsorship applications. The overall theme of the weekend school was Te Upoko o te Ika a Māui – Spreading the net – and there were key 4 themes:

  • Capturing transferrable skills
  • Networking and leading from any position
  • Innovative Technology
  • Partnerships between libraries and other agencies

 

There were a wide variety of librarians represented as attendees and speakers, from public libraries, tertiary libraries, school libraries and specialised libraries (eg. for corporate companies). I would probably not have mixed with such a breadth of librarians had it not been for us all being under the LIANZA umbrella. One thing that stood out was how several of the speakers had crossed in their library career among the different library types, showing how transferable library qualifications, skills and experience were across sectors.

 

Looking at Leadership

One theme that was well-explored over the weekend was leadership. (Read more about LIANZA’s leadership skills and competencies here).

 

“What do leaders really do?” contemplated John Coster. Leadership, he said, is not making plans, solving problems, or organising people, although they do these things. He said what they do is prepare the organisation and people for change.

 

Several speakers at the conference shared this quote:

“It is not the strongest species that survives nor the most intelligent but the ones with the most responsiveness to change.“ Charles Darwin

 

Sue Roberts, University Librarian and Director, Libraries and Learning Services at the University of Auckland spoke about leading – and learning – through discomfort; that challenge and discomfort happens on the journey as a leader but where the magic happens is outside your comfort zone. She said to “move towards the magic.” Roberts answer to  “What is Leadership?” was: “Anyone who lets themselves be accountable for finding potential or processes.” She said that globally, people are increasingly working in VUCA – “volatile uncertain complex and ambiguous” situations and are having to respond to this. (You can listen to an interview with Sue Roberts talk about leading through change, leading a learning culture, advocacy, innovation and risk taking on Library Chat podcasts page via the LIANZA website.

 

There was talk about Daniel Goldman’s emotional intelligence.

  1. Self-awareness,
  2. Self-management,
  3. Other awareness
  4. Other management

There was talk of having a core purpose, a mission, values – a call to start your own mission if you haven’t one and the need for a personal vision.

What is your vision?

What do you want to achieve?

This questioning tied-in nicely with on a hands-on workshop role modelling GROW Coaching – GROW stands for Goal, Options, Reality and a Will / Way Forward.

 

Brigid Brammer, Coach at Wellington City Libraries, spoke about ‘Leading from all levels’, that is, whether your job title anointed you as an official ‘leader’ or not, you can lead from any place on a topic, issues, projects, be a role model, etc. Brammer also talked about recognising situations when you are not communicating well. She talked about being mindful of emotional language eg. the villain, the victim, the helpless story.

 

On self-awareness, one speaker talked about ‘Acute attention discipline’ – that is, being present in the moment. They said that what people value most was someone else’s attention and this really struck a cord for me – whether it is our library patrons wanting to feel truly heard or our colleagues.

 

There were a wide variety of other talks, including ones on personal digital archiving, finance and budgeting (brought to life by Ivy Guo as a fairytale story with heroes and villains) and the value of networking and partnerships.

 

Paula Eskett, now at CORE Education, and formerly from Christchurch City Libraries closed the conference with an inspiring talk about a refugee boy that brought tears to the eyes. He used to come into where she worked at Upper Riccarton Library as a young boy and Paula met him again later in life and it made her wonder if she had done enough to make the libraries a positive experience for him and his new refugee family all those years ago and reminded us to reflect on how invaluable kind and caring interactions are for our library patrons. She left the attendees with a powerful story to reflect on our individual influence.

 

Attending the conference was also a chance to see LIANZA’s Emerging Leaders Kōtuku programme in action, as I’ve wondered what was involved in it. Those being mentored in this leadership helped organise and spoke at the conference, which was a first for some. They put themselves in a vulnerable position, but in a safe space, which was another form of developing leadership that we heard about.

 

The next time you see a call to apply for conference sponsorship or a role you’d love to apply for, just do it! In the meantime, consider joining LIANZA as a member and being part of your local regional group, like Aoraki LIANZA, which has great events, opportunities to network, conference and weekend schools and professional development.

 

Kim, Canterbury

First event for 2017!

On Wednesday 22 March the first Aoraki event of the year took place at the new-ish (3-4 years old) Lincoln Library, a branch of the Selwyn District Libraries. It was a great opportunity for those who don’t have the opportunity to get out to Lincoln much to come and explore. Members were invited to take a self-directed tour of the library to look at the collection and the various spaces created around it. There was an interesting debate among a few of us as we tried to work out what the cartoon silhouettes were that were printed on the glass outside the staff area – no one could agree on what it could be (I thought it may be one of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles) until Chrissie, branch manager for Lincoln, decided that it had to be Shrek since it was printed next to a donkey.

Vicki, Selwyn Libraries Manager, then spoke about some of the background around the Selwyn Libraries journey, from volunteer run libraries in the 1990s to where they are now. It was a fascinating talk that covered how Selwyn, in all its districts, came to form due to the resources in the area, and continued on to the formation of the libraries, right down to the future construction of the new Rolleston Library.

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After exploring the library we popped over The Laboratory right next door for dinner and a drink. I just wanted to take a moment to say how fantastic the staff were at The Laboratory when I contacted them to book space for 20-odd dinner attendees. Normally there is a rental fee, charged by the hour, to hire one of their function spaces but the manager said that libraries and librarians do so much for community, so they gave us a discount and let us use one of their spaces for free – it’s always lovely to hear from others how much they appreciate what we do. Dinner was an absolute feast. I don’t think anyone thought we’d end up with so much food. We had dish after dish show up, and that was just the entrees. By the time the pizzas showed up I think a number of us were wondering if we’d have to be rolled out the door by the end of dinner.

Special thanks to Vicki sharing some of the history of Selwyn with us and the journey of the Selwyn Libraries. Thanks also to Chrissie for staying late for us to explore the library, it was greatly appreciated.

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If you have any feedback or ideas about what we can do in the future, please send them through to me at: Sarah.Fraser@lincoln.ac.nz

I hope to see you at the next Aoraki LIANZA event!

– Sarah

 

New committee member

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Last year, we said goodbye to long-standing committee members Rachel Huston, and Craig Murray. Thanks, Rachel, and Craig, for your service.

We were delighted ro welcome Jan Kotlowski to the committee. Jan is a Library Assistant in the Access Team at Ara Institute of Canterbury. Jan has already taken part in our recent meetings and activities, including a star turn on the drums at our Te Hāpua Halswell visit. The committee is looking forward to having Jan on board, as we plan our exciting events for the year. Welcome Jan!

March event

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Now that I have your undivided attention…….

There won’t be cake, but we can promise a sweet time at our next event:

When: Wednesday, 22nd March, at 6 pm

Where: Lincoln Library & Service Centre, 22 Gerald Street, Lincoln. (See map below)

What:

  • Welcome by the Manager, Selwyn Libraries

  • Self-directed tour of the library

  • Address by LIANZA President, Te Paea Taiuru

  • * Dinner at The Laboratory bar & cafė 15 West Belt, Lincoln (Right next door to the library!) – Craft beers, selection of wines, wood-fired pizzas. Pay for your own meal. (Free nibbles, courtesy of LIANZA)

Bring a friend! They do not need to be a member of LIANZA. The more the merrier!

*You must RSVP in order to attend the dinner, as we need to know numbers

RSVP by Friday 10th March to Sarah Fraser

 

lincoln-library

TELSIG Journal Discussion Group – all welcome!

Announcing the first meeting of the year for the Christchurch TELSIG Journal Discussion Group. Read on for details of venue, and the discussion topic. Go on! You know you want to!

When: Tuesday, 24 January, at 5.30 pm.

Where: UC Central Library, Level 2, Room 210 (see floor plan below)

Parking is free after 5 pm, but people should not park in ‘reserved’ parking spaces.

The closest car park is the Science Road car park (see map below).

Entry is from Ilam Road via Science Road. (Please note that there is currently no entry to campus via University Drive from the Clyde Road end).

Everyone is welcome to come to the TELSIG Journal Discussion Groups. They are a great way to meet and mingle with fellow librarians, motivate yourself to read LIS literature and  learn new ideas to take back to your workplace, and you don’t need to be a member of LIANZA or TELSIG, or a tertiary librarian to attend. A bonus is that if you are professionally registered, it’s a great way to fill in an activity or two in your revalidation journal. Keep reading for the discussion topic for our next meeting.

 

level2-central-libary-floorplan

 

 

science-road-parking

The journal article and questions for discussion are as follows:

Greenland, K. (2013). Negotiating self-presentation, identity, ethics, readership and privacy in the LIS blogosphere: a review of the literature. Australian Academic & Research Libraries, 44(4), 217-225.

Discussion questions:

  • Do you write a blog? If so, why? What about? Is it private or public? Is it personal or for your job?
  • Do you read blogs? If so, why? What are they? How do they help you professionally?  If not, why not?
  • Can you maintain your privacy if you write publicly?
  • Are you, as blog author, accountable for the comments on your blog entries? Should they be mediated by you to ensure you control the content?
  • Do you agree that publicly blogging as a librarian, means you potentially are representative of all (or a subset of) librarians as a result of your writing? If so, how might this affect what you write?

 

If you have any questions about the meeting, please contact Caroline Anderson

 

 

Social Media with DK in Christchurch

Registrations close Thursday 26 January. Spaces are filling up fast so get in quick to reserve your spot!

DK (justadandak.com) will be running two classes on social media on 28 February in Christchurch.  For more information on the courses visit LIANZA’s website here.

Social Media Fundamentals Presentation – 75mins beginning at 11 am (Maximum 40)

Member price: $50          Non-member: $75

Social Media Curation Masterclass – 2.5 hrs beginning at 1pm  (Maximum 14)

Member price:  $150      Non Member: $225

This is a great opportunity to expand your knowledge base and maybe learn a few new tricks and tools, or build on what you already know about social media.

Te Hāpua Halswell Centre visit

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On Tuesday 29 November we were treated to a tour of the fantastic new Te Hāpua Halswell Centre. Although the swimming pool looked tempting on such a warm evening, we resisted the urge to plunge in and instead were treated to a tour of the amazing facilities by Pam and Dan, followed by a presentation from Dyane Hosler (Community Libraries Manager). We also had the opportunity to play and explore in the interactive learning centre. Some of us tested our musical talents on the electronic drum kit and keyboard, whilst others dabbled with the 3D pens and learned some basic programming skills playing with strange little electronic bugs called Bee Bots. It’s amazing how uninhibited adults can be when presented with toys! I can imagine that children would have hours of fun there and would have to be torn away (we certainly experienced that problem with some of the adults).

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While everyone was listening to Te Hāpua’s journey (which has only just recently celebrated its one year anniversary) the committee was in the tearoom preparing supper for everyone. Once we had gotten to grips with the combination microwave oven (don’t we just love all this new technology) we enjoyed a tasty supper, followed by Secret Santa gifts, which were unwrapped with much anticipation.image

Waiting at the bus stop handily situated outside, I reflected on how quickly our public libraries are changing and adapting to the new models in order to continue to engage and inspire users, and how fortunate we are in New Zealand to have so many talented staff who are agile in embracing so many changes.

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Many thanks to Dyane, Pam, and Dan for hosting us at the end of their busy working days!